• 28 May, 2024

15 STRONGEST Buildings in the World

“15 STRONGEST Buildings in the World,” The top 15 earthquake-resistant structures, starting with Taipei 101 in Taiwan, which utilizes advanced technology like internal dampers and massive dampers to withstand earthquakes. Number 14 is the Trans America Pyramid in San Francisco, with deep foundations and reinforced walls.

“15 STRONGEST Buildings in the World,” The top 15 earthquake-resistant structures, starting with Taipei 101 in Taiwan, which utilizes advanced technology like internal dampers and massive dampers to withstand earthquakes. Number 14 is the Trans America Pyramid in San Francisco, with deep foundations and reinforced walls. The FAO building in Japan uses thermoplastic carbon fiber composite cables as external support, while the Shanghai Tower in China has an internal damper system and a massive shock absorber. The Rapa Temple in Japan, the oldest earthquake-proof building, uses floating bricks and sandbox technology. The Public Safety Building in Salt Lake City and the tomb of Cyrus the Great in Iran are also highlighted for their earthquake resistance. The CCTV Building in Beijing and the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant in Japan are discussed for their unique designs and earthquake resilience. The Koskupos Bridge in Greece and the Té Reforma building in Mexico City are two structurally remarkable constructions, with the latter holding the top spot as an earthquake-resilient airport terminal. 

The top 15 earthquake-resistant structures, starting with number 15, Taipei 101 in Taiwan. Taipei 101, which was once the tallest building in the world, was constructed with earthquake resiliency in mind due to the country’s high frequency of earthquakes. The building is not only earthquake-resistant but also sustainable and eco-friendly, earning a LEED certification and the title of the tallest Green Building in the world. Taipei 101 features advanced technology such as an internal damper that stabilizes the building during earthquakes and has a massive 728-ton damper that spans five floors. The building has withstood several earthquakes, including a 6.8 magnitude quake during construction and a 7.6 magnitude quake after its grand opening. Number 14 on the list is the Trans America Pyramid in San Francisco, California, which was built to withstand high seismic activity. The building’s foundations reach over 52 feet deep, and its walls are reinforced with rods for additional support. The Trans America Pyramid remained unscathed during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, which measured 6.9 on the Richter scale.

The FAO building in Japan and the Shanghai Tower in China are highlighted for their unique earthquake resistance features. The FAO building, designed by Kango Kumam, uses thermoplastic carbon fiber composite cables as external support instead of relying on a strengthened internal core. This innovative design, which resembles Spider-Man’s webs, could potentially revolutionize earthquake-resistant architecture. The Shanghai Tower, China’s third tallest building, was constructed with extreme weather conditions and earthquakes in mind. Engineers carefully selected the site location and used over 980 piles and 2.15 million cubic feet of reinforced concrete for the foundation. Additionally, the tower features an internal damper system and a 1,000-ton shock absorber to prevent excess movement during earthquakes.

The Rapa Temple in Japan, dates back to 12113 AD, and its unique earthquake-resistant features. The temple utilizes a technique called “floating brick”, which uses lightweight bricks that maintain their strength while reducing the overall weight on the foundation and allowing movement during earthquakes. Additionally, the temple employs sandbox technology, a trench filled with a unique blend of sand, granite powder, haritaki powder, and jaggery powder, to control vibrations and further fortify the building against natural disasters. The temple also has molten iron poured into its walls, roof, and pillars for added strength. The Public Safety Building in Salt Lake City, Utah, is another earthquake-resistant structure, designed with a massive earthquake in mind due to the city’s high seismic risk. The building, which houses the Salt Lake City police, fire department, and emergency operations center, cost $125 million to build and was designed to remain intact and functional during a 7.5 magnitude earthquake. The tomb of Cyrus the Great in Iran, the oldest earthquake-proof building in the world, has successfully weathered many earthquakes and natural disasters for over 2,500 years due to its masterful fusion of stone, talc, sand mortar, and lime plaster, as well as its unique foundation design that allows the upper portion to glide smoothly over the lower one during an earthquake. The CCTV Building in Beijing is another earthquake-resistant structure that will continue to stand strong during earthquakes.

The presenter discusses the CCTV Building in Beijing, China, and the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. The CCTV Building, designed by Rem Koolhaas, is a 54-story tower with an unusual design that locals have nicknamed “big pants.” Its deconstructivist architecture and unique shape help distribute seismic forces more evenly, making it highly earthquake-resistant. Engineers tested its strength using computer simulations and identified potential weaknesses, ensuring its durability. The Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the largest in the world by net electrical power rating, is located in an earthquake-prone region. To ensure its safety, four stories of the plant’s foundation are fixed into layers of bedrock and sand underwater. In 2007, the plant withstood a 6.6 magnitude earthquake, but during a later 6.8 magnitude quake, reactors were shut down, and a fire and pipe bursts occurred. The plant was upgraded, and all seven reactors were eventually upgraded to withstand future earthquakes.

Discusses two structurally remarkable constructions: the Koskupos Bridge in Greece and the Té Reforma building in Mexico City. The Koskupos Bridge, located in Greece and spanning the Gulf of Corin, is not only earthquake-resistant but also one of the longest multispanned cable-stay bridges in the world. Its cable-stay design, deep foundations, and seismic dampers make it flexible and stable, reducing the risk of structural damage during earthquakes. The Té Reforma building in Mexico City, situated in the Financial District, is an 87-foot-tall triangular tower with a unique open-book shape and a contemporary glass and steel facade. Its reinforced concrete walls and flexibility features, such as hinges and crumple zones, allow it to shift and absorb energy during earthquakes. The building also has deep foundations that sink 196 feet below ground, providing crucial stability. Both structures have undergone rigorous testing and have received prestigious awards for their architectural elegance and sustainability.

Discusses the earthquake-resilient terminal that holds the top spot. Despite Mother Nature’s unpredictable earthquakes, this airport terminal is designed to withstand such natural disasters. The speaker expresses confidence in the terminal’s ability to withstand earthquakes, making it an impressive engineering feat. The video then concludes with the speaker thanking viewers for watching and promising to see them in the next video.